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2 edition of Sophrosyne; self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature. found in the catalog.

Sophrosyne; self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature.

Helen North

Sophrosyne; self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature.

by Helen North

  • 188 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Cornell University Press in Ithaca, N. Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Greek literature -- History and criticism,
  • Self-knowledge in literature.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesCornell studies in classical philology, v. 35
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA3015.S4N67
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxx, 391 p.
    Number of Pages391
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19231857M

    51 works Search for books with subject Self-knowledge in literature. Search. Sophrosyne Helen North Not in Library. Sophrosyne; self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature Helen North , Accessible book, Protected DAISY, Philosophy, Criticism and interpretation, Greek literature, Psychological aspects, Literature. That scholarship includes her first book, Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature (), in which Helen identified the nuances of this ancient Greek ideal and traced their development, not only through all the major works of Greek and Roman literature and philosophy, but in political oratory, epigrams, and.

    Sophrosyne definition, moderation; discretion; prudence. See more. Sophrosyne is first recorded in English in the late s, but the concept is syne comes from the Greek word sōphrosúnē, which derives from the Greek sṓphrōn, meaning “prudent.”The first part of sophrosyne comes from the root sôs, meaning “sound” (healthy), and the second part comes from the root. The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Political Thought - edited by Christopher Rowe May Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature (Ithaca NY). Nussbaum.

    Helen North is the author of Sophrosyne ( avg rating, 4 ratings, 0 reviews), Sophrosyne ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews), Blurred Lines ( av 4/5(4). In Book Four of Plato's Republic, Socrates divides the soul. This chapter shows that according to Book Four's division of the soul, the soul's unearned unity must and can be complex. It identifies a Platonic account of complex unity that explains why the whole soul is a locus of moral responsibility and at least enables explaining the unity of.


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Sophrosyne; self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature by Helen North Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sophrosyne: Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature Paperback – Febru by Helen North (Author), Giles Laurén (Editor) out of 5 stars 2 ratings. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ PaperbackCited by: At the deepest level, sophrosyne is related to the Greek tendency to interpret all kinds of experience—whether moral, political, aesthetic, physical, or metaphysical—in terms of harmony and a level more susceptible to historical analysis, it is an expression of the self-knowledge and self-control that the Greek polis demanded of its citizens, to curb and counterbalance their individualism and self-assertion.

Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature Hardcover – January 1, by Helen North (Author) out of 5 stars 2 ratings5/5(2). texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK Sophrosyne: self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature Item Preview remove-circle self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature by North, Helen.

Publication date TopicsPages: Sophrosyne And The Rhetoric Of Self-Restraint: Polysemy & Persuasive Use Of An Ancient Greek Value Term (Mnemosyne, Bibliotheca Classica Batava Supplementum). Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more.

Sophrosyne: self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature in SearchWorks catalog. Sophrosyne Helen North: Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature.

(Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, xxxv.) Pp. xx+ Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature (Cornell Studies in Class. Phil., 35). Ithaca (N.Y.), Cornell Univ. Pr., XX, p. in: Mnemosyne Volume 21 Issue 1 ().

Sophrosyne: self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature pp. Add to My Bookmarks Export citation. Type Book Author(s) Helen F. North Date Publisher Cornell University Press Pub place Ithaca Euripides' Hippolytus and Greek Religion Next: Shame and necessity Previous: Analyzing Greek Gods.

Library availability. View. Sophrosyne: self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature / by Helen North Cornell University Press Ithaca, N.Y Australian/Harvard Citation North, Helen. Sophrosyne: self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature, Issue 67 Volume 35 of Cornell studies in classical philology Sophrosyne: Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature, Helen North: Author: Helen North: Publisher: Cornell University Press, Original from: the University of California: Digitized: Sophrosyne: Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature, Issue 67 Issue 35 of Cornell studies in classical philology, Cornell University Sophrosyne: Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature, Helen North: Author: Helen North: Publisher: Cornell University Press, Length: pages: Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan.

Get this from a library. Sophrosyne: self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature. [Helen F North] -- A family crosses a river on a ferryboat and observes how the ferry operates.

While of paramount importance to Ancient Greek society, sophrosyne, the value of self-restraint, constitutes a notoriously complex concept, and provides the speaker of Ancient Greek with a subtle instrument for verbal persuasion. This study provides a new description of the semantics of sophrosyne in Archaic and Classical Greek, based on a model from the field of cognitive linguistics.

DOI: / Corpus ID: Sophrosyne: Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature @inproceedings{NorthSophrosyneSA, title={Sophrosyne: Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature}, author={Helen F. North}, year={} }. Sophrosyne self-knowledge and self-restraint in Greek literature This edition published in by Cornell University Press in Ithaca, N.Y.

Sophrosyne (Greek: σωφροσύνη) is an ancient Greek concept of an ideal of excellence of character and soundness of mind, which when combined in one well-balanced individual leads to other qualities, such as temperance, moderation, prudence, purity, decorum, and self-control.

An adjectival form is "sophron.". Helen North, whose book Sophrosyne: Self Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature was published inhas extended her explorations into areas suggested by that book "from a point of view more topical than chronological and with greater attention to contexts in which sophrosyne was but one of several related and interacting.

), to practice self-restraint (,bis) or to limit their plans for conquest (). In presenting the Seven Sages as advocating self-knowledge and self-restraint, Herodotus was following an already well-established tradition linking the Sages with sophrosyne (North.

Sophrosyne and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, Rademaker, Adriaan. Sophrosyne and the Rhetoric of Self-Restraint: Polysemy and Persuasive Use of an Ancient Greek Value Term.

Leiden: Brill, Santas, Gerasimos. "Socrates at Work on Virtue and Knowledge in Plato's Charmides.". In she received the Goodwin Award of the American Philological Association for her first book, Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature (). She also received honorary doctorates from Trinity College Dublin, Fordham University, La .5.

Support for this claim can be drawn from the careful work of Helen North in her book Sophrosyne, Self-knowledge and Self-restraint in Greek Literature (Ithaca, N. Y., ). North (69) finds mastery of passion the “new emphasis in Euripides' interpretation of” sophrosyne; and she also writes (70): “Certain Sophists appear to have been among the first to develop systematically the.Kirkwood, G.

M. Early Greek Monody: The History of a Poetic Type. [37 CUP 37 JSTOR] Hansen, Esther V. The Attalids of Pergamon. [36 CUP 36 JSTOR] North, Helen F. Sophrosyne: Self-Knowledge and Self-Restraint in Greek Literature. [35 CUP 35 JSTOR]